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urgeent. u.s. and allied forces firing on libya igniting the biggest international military effort since the iraq war. this is a special edition of the fox report. new images showing u.s. navy ships firing missiles at qaddafi air defenses and teeping up with britain,itiny and canada all to support a rebel uprising in that country. it appears on the verge of defeat. secretary of state hillary clinton said left unchecked qaddafi will commit unspeakable atrocities . the first shots coming from french fighter jets. a plane shot down over the outskirts of benghazi bursting in flames . crashed and sending thick black smoke in the sky. rebels, cheering and celebrating as international forces move in tryying to protect them. so far 112 cruz missiles launched near tripoli. we have fox news team coverage on the ground . mike emanuel is traveling with the president in brazil and steve first in tripoli. steve, any reaction from qaddafi to the air trikes? >>reporter: john, what we heard from qaddafi in the past several days. one of defiance and he said he will retaliate against military or civilian t
. right now on "fox news sunday." missile strikes. the u.s. and britain fire more than 100 cruise missiles as coalition forces act to protect the libyan rebels from muammar qaddafi. we'll have an update on talk with the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen live on "fox news sunday." then two leading senators weigh in on the mix, lindsey graham and jack reed. japan works t work contain a nr disaster. we will get the latest from japan and talk with the secretary of energy steven chu. plus, we ask our sunday panel if the president is taking the lead on these issues or following. all right now on "fox news sunday." hello again from fox news in washington where we are tracking two major stories. we have a reporter in libya where the u.s. and its allies are using military force to protect the antiqaddafi rebels. and in japan, where officials are making progress toward bringing a nuclear plant under control. we'll have more on that later and talk with the secretary of energy. first, libya, u.s. stealth bombers struck a major libyan airfield. and qaddafi called the raids terr
developing situation out of libya. >> heather: the u.s. navy has three submarines for operations against libya but france fired the opening shots and military intervention. protests continuing around libya despite muammar khadafy refuting reports that he is firing on his own people. he says she prepared to die for his country. >> gregg: steve harrigan is streaming live. what is the latest there? >> a lot of nervous gunfire on the ground on the capitol coming from the ground, small arms fire as well as anti-aircraft fire. we are not sure what they are exactly shooting here. reports of cruise fires, state television in libya saying they have hit the capitol of tripoli but i'm standing here we would hear a cruise missile. it has not hit air defense systems here yet. it's clear that french warplanes are in the fight around the city of benghazi. 20 french jets enforcing the no-fly zone. they have engaged one libyan military vehicle and they destroyed four government tanks, unfirmed reports. people are fleeing to the east as fast as they can. khadafy government forces are inside the city with
. right now, on fox news sunday. ♪ missile strikes, the u.s. and britain fire more than 100 cruise missiles, as quo litigation forces act to protect the libyan rebels from muammar qaddafi. we'll have an update from libya, and, talk with a chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, live, only on fox news sunday. then, two leading senators weigh in on the mission, lindsey graham and jack reed. japan works to contain a nuclear disaster, what does the crisis there mean for energy policy at home? we'll talk with the secretary of internally, steven chu and we'll ask our sunday panel if the president is taking the lead on the tough issues or following. all, right now on fox news sunday. >> chris: we are trashing two major stories, we have a reporter in libya where the u.s. and allies are using military force, to protect the anti-qaddafi rebels. and, in japan, where officials are making progress for bringing a nuclear plant under control. we'll have more on that, later and talk with the secretary of energy, but, first, libya, allied officials say they hit more than 20 air
, showing tomahawk missiles being fired from a u.s. ship, the u.s. and our allies launching airstrikes against the qaddafi regime earlier today hoping to prevent further attacks by libyan forces on rebels and other civilians, and, welcome to a brand new hour of america's news headquarters. >> jamie: i'm jimmamie colby. the french fighter jets are enforcing the no-fly zone over the north african nation and the rebel fighters are battling forces loyal to muammar qaddafi in the city of benghazi. steve harrigan is streaming live from the capital of tripoli where there is a lot of activity as well, steve, tell us the latest. >> reporter: right now we're hearing the steady pounding of anti-aircraft fire off my right, in the distance. it's not clear whether they are firing at actually planes, or just in anticipation of attack. i can tell you about the cruise missiles. we have not heard any here in the center of tripoli, two miles away from colonel qaddafi's headquarters. muammar qaddafi has responded to those cruise missile attacks in a rather unusual address on state television. he was not s
>> tonight, battle for libya. u.s.-led attacks and enforcing a no-fly zone intensifies for a second day. but the pentagon says, muammar qaddafi is not a target. i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, on the ground, a defiant qaddafi shoots back bowing a long war as rebels take rounds in benghazi. >> anxiety rises in quake ravaged japan as food and water show signs of nuclear contamination. >>> and staying connected, technology provide's lifeline for students trying to find loved ones in japan's disaster zone. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> good evening. a second wave of u.s.-led air attacks against libya is under way tonight as b2 bombers from the first wave return to their base in missouri late tonight. on the ground, u.s. aircraft attack libyan forces south of benghazi for the first time while muammar qaddafi remained defiant, calling nations allied against him the party of satan and vowing to fight inch by inch for his country. we have correspondents on the ground in libya and in washington with the latest and we begin with national se
are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nuclear complex with so much problems in the past couple of days, today, another reactor facing the possibility of a meltdown. they say they are in control of the situation. but the evacuation from the region around the reactors continues and the possibility of poisoning from radioactivity also going forward. dozens are testing positive for that. now to the number. there is one official here, in one region who said yesterday that 10,000 people were missing. now he is saying he feels that 10,000 people are dead in his region alone. that may add to the figure. we traveled today and we notice shortages are a problem. of food, of fuel and power in this village, of everything people need to get by. that is why relief is rushing to this area. tod
from u.s. and british ships and submarines struck more than 20 intergreated air defense systems and other air defense facilities ashore. >> geraldo: this is a fox news alert. today, after a painful but ultimately successful week long effort to enlist international support in an operation named odyssey dawn the united states military led the air and naval forces of two of our closest allies, france and britain in launching a massive attack which we are told has already severely disabled the air defenses of the dictator who refuses to stop his vicious assault on his own people. hi, everybody. i'm geraldo rivera. welcome to our two hour special report on the day the libyan civil war became our fight. the offensive to protect libya's people from their own government and ultimately take down the madman who has plagued us for more than four decades began saturday when french jets soared over qaddafi's forces besieging the rebel held city of benghazi, reportedly taking out four of qaddafi's tanks. the initial french action was soon dwarfed by a huge salvo of cruz missiles. 11 114 fired
assess what the u.s. and the world are doing now, and what comes next. >> ifill: plus, we examine what the unrest in the middle east is doing to gas prices here at home. >> woodruff: then, we have the first of two reports from guatemala. tonight, ray suarez looks at programs aimed at combating a long history of domestic violence. >> suarez: as part of a nationwide effort to improve women's health these workshops are pushing back against a rape culture trying to lower the epidemic levels of violence against women and girls. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks to scott shane of the new york times about the obama administration's decision to resume military trials at the guantanamo bay prison. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and rel
. a simpler way to ship. >> u.s. officials confirms to fox news. qaddafi air defenses are seriously disabled. it is too early to predict what they might do in response to today's strike. >> new images shows u.s. navy ships firing missiles and teeping wup britain, france and canada and italy to enforce a no fly zone all to support a rebel uprising in that country until now appeared on the verge of defeat. even before the attack a libyan fighter jet hit boy rebel fire or a coalition plane. the rebels on the ground cheered and celebrating. as international forces move in. 114 tomahawk cruise missiles fired thus far and targeting 20 sites near tripoli. we have live coverage on the ground. molly henningberg has the u.s. reponce. we begin with steve harington streaming live from tripoli. steve. >>reporter: a message of defiance from qaddafi. he said the attackers are colonialist and where onist who want to take over libyan oil. this time he was in a curious move it is a phone conversation recorded and that may speak to his ability to have communications or he could be in hiding. it is not clear. h
of the u.s. military? we'll get an update from the region and talk with two of the senate's most influencial voices on foreign policy, john mccain and joe lieberman. and healthcare reform one year later. we will ask our sunday group what is the long-term prognosis for the president's signature legislation. all, right now on "fox news sunday." and hello again from fox news in washington. before we talk with our guests, we want to bring you the latest on events in the middle east. in syria, government soldiers have been deployed around the cities that have seen the biggest protests. in yemen, talks for a peaceful transfer of power failed saturday. now, authorities worry about al-qaeda gaining strength in that country. and in libya, bombing by u.s. and allied planes has paveed the way for rebel forces to retake the key oil town. for more on libya let's bring in fox news correspondent steve harrigan in tripoli. >> a rapid advance for the rebels. moving quickly toward what they say is an eventual battle here in tripoli. they have taken the key town of ajdabiya. the air strikes have ta
. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
>> couric: tonight, as allied forces pound targets in libya, the u.s. military insists qaddafi is not a target, but the commander in chief makes it clear... >> it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebels solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the opera
coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't reach the plant. however, having said that, the levels of radiation in tokyo have returned to normal. apparently the italian embassy found that levels of radiation were a fifth of what they were in r
. this is overnight videotape from the u.s. navy, a u.s. coalition launching two nights of punishing air attacks targeting mommar gadhafi's forces, b52 bombers, jet fighters, more than 120 tom hawk cruise missiles, scattering progovernment forces on the ground in libya, the long time leader vowing a long war ahead. good morning, everybody. we've got it all covered for you. what a way to start a weefnlgt i'm bill hemmer, welcome to "america's newsroom". good morning to you martha. martha: good morning, bill. i am martha maccallum. an international air assault, all but crippling libya's air defenses, that according to the u.s. military. listen to this: >> there has been no new air activity by the regime and we have de tented no radar emissions from the defense sites targeted and there has been a significant decrease in the use of all libyan air surveillance radar which is most of those appear to be limited now only to the areas around tripoli and surt. we are not ruling out strikes against valid targets when and if the need arises. martha: there you have it, u.s., british and french planes blastin
members of the arab league. doug mcelway, thank you very much. president obama said u.s. forces willing not be on the ground in liba. sit going to be possible to complete this mission without sending them in? former pentagon official kt mcfarland joins us on the telephone with that. repeatedly they said troops will not be involved and american troops haven't been involved in aircraft. it's only been tomorrowa hawks right? >> right. we've not at this point seen american aircraft flying over liba. now there is a thought there would be a black hawk down incident is for most. the u.s. aircraft will not fly over libya if they do at all until air defenses have been taken out. that is what this bombing has been. there is a question of can we have a clean neat strike? nobody, no boots on the ground zront to get hands dirty. someone has got to go in on the ground. muammar gaddafi is probably not going to give up at all. he knows he doesn't get to retire in florida. he knows he'll go to the international courts and have to face military charges that he has committed crimes against humanity. so he
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
and the crash of a u.s. military jet in the east. and we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali, who denounced moammar qaddafi last month. >> ifill: then, margaret warner looks at rifts within the nato alliance about the libya mission. >> brown: from japan, we get the latest on the cleanup in the hard-hit city of sendai. >> it might not seem much to you, but believe me it's a huge step that you now can actually drive up at the airport's departure terminal. >> ifill: and judy woodruff interviews japan's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshou
of people in london. dozens of u.s. allies that at least one libyan opposition leader. she discussed the coalition's goals for ending the not war. >> to urge qaddafi to implement a real cease-fire that is not going to be immediately breached by his own forces. to withdraw from those areas that he has taken by force. and to look for a political resolution which could include his leaving the country. >> shepard: this comes as a senior u.s. officials tells fox news that qaddafi's inner circle shows signs of, quote, cracking with some of his most trusted advisors questioning whether he can survive. that official also tells us that morale among the libyan troops is low. but the situation on the ground in the not war does not reflect that over the past 24 hours, colonel qaddafi's forces have made significant gains against the rebel fighters. those rebels advanced quickly over the last couple days qaddafi's hometown of sirte. rockets forced them to double back today, retreat. this despite the coalition firing 22 tomahawk missiles at a cost of $33 million. and flying more than 100 air strike
senators gary hart and norm coleman assess president obama's decision to use u.s. military power in libya. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people des
in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may have been too close for comfort for the libyan dictator. mark phillips is in tripoli. >> reporter: of all the targets that have been hit in these attacks, this flattened building in the qaddafi compound in tripoli is the one the qaddafi loyalists have complained about most. this is the attack they claim was launched to kill him. despite the hundreds of people who have gathered or been gathered around the complex to provide protection. >> families, children, men and women have come from everywhere to stay day and night to protect this location, to protect this location and the rocket hits only 52 to 100 meters away from them. >> reporter: qaddafi himself was probably not in his tent. he hasn't been seen since before the bombing began. his location a se
? and in japan nuclear chaos. tonight, how the newest trouble forced workers and the u.s. navy to clear the area. first from fox this monday night, the desperation tactics of muammar qaddafi. we are seeing new evidence that the dictator is using human shields to keep international coalition to keep from hitting key targets. this as america unleashes fireplace in yet another conflict in the middle east. this, the scene over tripoli just hours ago as antiaircraft fire streak through the night's sky, searching for any coalition aircraft. allied military leaders have been working to establish a no-fly zone over libya. in an effort to prevent qaddafi from attacking his own people. commanders are also targeting libyan troops who threaten civilians they tell us. we are told war planes focused a lot of their fireplace near the eastern city of benghazi, carrier jets reportedly dropped at least 12 bombs there overnight. >> and through a variety of reports, we know that regime ground forces that were in the vicinity of benghazi now possess little will or capability to resume offensive operations. >> u.s. a
. >> shepard: lawrence taylor on prostitutes and family. a u.s. fighter jet those down and the crew forced to eject over libyan territory. why the military has launched an investigation. libyan opposition forces are planning a new push. >> what is your plan now? >> the highway leads to be a da i ajdabiya. >> command and control business is plaintiff's complicated. >> look at who could be calling the shots and how long it will take. >> shepard: plus, qaddafi's stash of cash. the libyan leader has been hoarding oil money for decades. tonight, where he is hiding his dollars. and how qaddafi's bank balance could tip the scales of this fight. first from fox this tuesday night, the libyan leader muammar qaddafi has come out of hiding, it would appear, to address his people and shout new threats against the world. you can see him there in the cube appearing on libyan state television, assuming it's from today, this is qaddafi's first public appearance in a week. and as coalition airplanes target his military infrastructure in our new war in libya, qaddafi said his forces would defeat libya's enem
's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. ouan yd'lt fi y indin the people at toyota, al
there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop genocide. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find it in the people at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a l
as a u.s. operation. so there really was a need from their point of view to build up enough international political support so that the united states could say -- stay if not in the background, at least sort of on the sidelines. >> and the president in his press conference, i thought it was striking to list the things that we're not going to do. we're not going to deploy ground troops. we're not going to use force to go beyond a well-defined goal. what's with all this not, not, not stuff? >> there's a lot of ambiguity. he did say we're not going to employ a ground force which is prohibited by the u.n. resolution as well. he also said the goal of the operation will not go beyond protecting civilians. but at the same time, he said qaddafi has lost the legitimacy to lead. and you had secretary clinton and you had the french government also saying that the logical result of this operation will be that the qaddafi regime is overthrown. so they've certainly injected -- gwen: a logical result, but is that the goal? they've now set out a goal they have to push him out of office. they can't stop s
establish the no-fly zone and suppress his air defences. >> reporter: the secretaries also made clear u.s. policy that moammar qaddafi must go is not the aim of the current mission. >> one of the things that i think is central is you don't, in a military campaign, set as a mission or a goal something you're not sure you can achieve. >> reporter: the critics on capitol hill say the administration's policy lacks clarity. >> i think there should have been a plan for what our objectives were, a debate as to why this was in our vital interest before we committed military forces to libya rd today nato assumed full command of the mission. the president says america's role will be limited. >> we're not putting any ground forces into libya. >> reporter: and that other union heaveal in the middle east like the recent bloody crack down in syria will be looked at case by case. >> each of these, we are looking at and an liz will-- analyzing carefully. but we can't draw some general, sweeping conclusions about the entire region. >> reporter: and president obama makes his pitch monday evening in a telev
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
i'm the u-s and french militaries fired missiles into libya.it's an internatiinal mission folbaum reports ... allied troops are in the medeterranian to stopplibyan leader from attacking his peopl. peeple. -------------------------------- p------------------------------- -------------------------------- -------------------------------- --------the u-s -- taking part in an international military operation to prooect people in libba. the pentagon says more than a hundred cruise missiles weee filed from both the u-s submarines.... attacking thee libyyn air defense systems. statement during his visit to brazil. obama: "the us is acting ... ... libyan people." eerlier france launched a militaay operation against qadaffi forces. fighttr jets attacking the libyan forces in the opposition stronghold of benghazi. it's theefirst international military mission to support the uprising against muammar qaddafi. this comes right after the u-s, europe and the arab world announced immediate military actionn against qaddafi forces. nicolas sarkozy: our airforce will oppose any aggression by colon
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 488 (some duplicates have been removed)

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